Fantasy Football Costs Business Billions

Courtesy of Risk Management Monitor.com

Courtesy of Risk Management Monitor.com

Football season is fast approaching and that can only mean one thing — fantasy football. For those who aren’t familiar with fantasy football, it is where you draft a team of real professional players at each position (quarterback, running back, etc.) and follow your team’s progress throughout the live professional football season.

Today, I ran across a very interesting article on the Houston Chronicle website that talked about fantasy football and the workplace. According to a study done by a Chicago Il, based firm, $13 billion dollars is lost in productivity to fantasy football.

The firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, used the average hourly earnings of private employee payrolls, and combined that with the estimated number of employed fantasy football participants. The study also claims that workers spend at least two hours a week focused on fantasy football, which is in concurrence with the professional football season.

Honestly, It sounds nearly impossible to put an exact number on the loss of productivity in a workplace setting because Fantasy football is such a big commitment by so many people. It can consume peoples’ lives to an extent, in which I find it hard to believe people spend just two hours every day on it. I can understand the allure of fantasy football because it’s exciting and an escape from the mundane routine of the business day.

While discussing it on today’s Price of Business show, Kevin Price (the show host), Sigmund (the show’s producer) and I discussed the impact of fantasy football. The impact is that like I stated earlier, people get consumed by the competition. With smartphones and fantasy football apps, we have the game literally in the palm of our hands and there is no stopping us from checking on our teams.

Fantasy football has been around before the internet, but it was nothing compared to what we have today. We are more connected now than ever before and as long as pro football is the number one sport in America, expect people to escape to the virtual football field.

A week with iOS 8

A little technology to add to my sports blog!

BGR

All things considered, the past year with my iPhone has been pretty boring.

I have discussed the state of smartphones countless times here on BGR. For savvy power users like myself — and like millions of BGR readers out there — we’re in a bit of a lull right now. Put plainly, 2013 was a pretty boring year for smartphone fans.

Innovation doesn’t grow on trees, and impressive progress has been made in the smartphone market over the past 18 months. Phones are thinner and sleeker than they ever have been before. Mobile operating systems like Android, iOS and Windows Phone have been updated with plenty of nifty new features.

Has anything been introduced that might truly excite power users, though? That’s open to debate. What most technology fans likely won’t debate, though, is that the new features introduced in iOS 7 were not exciting for savvy users. Not even…

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Jon Lester Thanks Red Sox, Fans In Full-Page Boston Globe Ad (Photo)

NESN.com

It’s no secret that Jon Lester enjoyed his time with the Boston Red Sox.

As one of their starting aces since 2006, Lester was a key member of the Red Sox for two World Series victories. He threw a no-hitter for Boston in 2008. He even received support from Red Sox Nation when he was diagnosed with and recovered from having cancer.

So it’s not surprising that the fans weren’t the only ones who felt some type of emotion when Lester was traded to the Oakland Athletics — along with outfielder Jonny Gomes — in exchange for Yoenis Cespedes.

The always classy Lester took out a full page ad in The Boston Globe to thank the Red Sox organization and its fans.

Lester’s message:

“Dear Red Sox Nation,

I have a lifetime of great memories of Boston highlighted by 2 World Championships! Boston will always be home and the love that Red Sox Nation has shown…

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